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.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including at the united nations security council, to respond in a swift, effective, and credible manner. >> davies said the u.s. could strengthen sanctions. he said existing penalties have already hampered north korea's nuclear program. davies has been holding discussions with his counterparts from china, as well japan and south korea. he said he hopes the chinese can use their influence with their allies in pyongyang. u.s. diplomats have made similar warnings over the years and the north koreans have ignored them. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took pow area year ago. it will use the same launch pad at a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first test in april, officials in pyongyang said the 30-meter, three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan, the united states and south korea said the launch was in fact a ballistic missile test. the test ended in failure with the rocket
best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was ful
as a nonmember observer state. many jewish groups denounced the u.n. action, saying it undermines future peace negotiations with israel. some u.s. christian and muslim leaders supported the move. the palestinians were not granted full u.n. membership, but their upgraded status could allow them access to other u.n. and international bodies, including the international criminal court where they could possibly bring charges against israel. the united states was one of nine nations that voted against the resolution. >>> in egypt, seven coptic christians and a controversial american pastor have been sentenced to death over an anti-islam film that sparked massive protests in several muslim countries in september. but the sentences can not be carried out since none of the eight lives in egypt. a u.s.-muslim organization urged the court to drop the charges, saying the prophet muhammed taught forgiveness. florida pastor terry jones was among those sentenced for promoting the film. in 2010, jones caused international outrage after he threatened to burn copies of the koran. >>>a neinterfaith center backe
in april. that launch ended in failure. they've given their schedule and planned trajectory to the u.n. in charge of maritime safety. officials with the international maritime organization say the north koreans pn to launch twee 7:00 a.m. and noon local time. the first stage of a three stage missile is expected to fall in the yellow seat west of south korea. the second is expected to land east of the philippines. alerts to shipping companies have been issued. government officials in seoul have seen the scenario before. foreign ministry officials met separately with envoys from japan, the united states, china and russia. it's believed they discussed ways to cancel the launch. the ships have technology to track missiles. they're also considering raising the country's alert status by one notch. >>> euro zone finance ministers approved a loan just last week. now the greeks have announced one way they will use the funds. what's the latest? >> one of the requirements for greek receiving the bailout fund is they cut down their debt. they will buy back government bonds a t a discount. greek of
. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water foroth washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will likely recover having made it in time
minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the firs
, but it denounced the u.n. vote as counter-productive to peace. >>> a prominent group of orthodox rabbis meanwhile voiced its support for israel's decision. >>> in a letter released by the vet c vatican this week, the pope issued new rules for charities that identify themselves as catholic. he instructued such groups to follow it, and they're barred from accepting money from organizations whose work runs counter to work teachings. although the pope did not specify, that could apply to funders that promote birth control. those charities found to violate the new rules can be stripped of their catholic dez natisignatio the local bishop. we have a special report from haiti where we found an american priest and doctor who is helping thousands of victims of earthquakes, hurricanes, hiv, choler and not least government bury rock sees. they're succeeds not with a big top down plan but by listening to what the haitians want. >> early each morning in the chapel, the shrouded bodies of infants and one adult on the are counted, the names written down for prayers that follow a daily mass. >> anybody that dies
would be held to account. >> brown: that was a view shared by u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon, speaking at a climate conference in qatar. >> the country has a fundamental responsibility to keep this stockpile of chemical weapons in the safest way. i have warned that if in any case these should be used then there will be huge consequences and they should be accountable. >> brown: and as fears of chemical warfare grow, the humanitarian crisis has steadily worsened. more refugees streamed into turkey today, fleeing syrian air raids. >> brown: for more on the syrian chemical weapons threat i'm joined by leonard spector, a weapons and nonproliferation expert with the monterey institute of international studies. that can be hard to say. welcome back. the white house says it has increased concern the government might be prepared to use these weapons. what does that mean? what are they seeing? >> we don't know precisely what they're seeing. there are rumors that there is some sort of preparation for the chemicals that would be used in these weapons. there are preliminary sts that
minister sergei lavrov and u.n. envoy lakdar brahimi who spoke to the press. >> we haven't taken any sensational decisions but i think we have agreed that the situation is bad and we have agreed that we must continue to work together to see how we can find creative ways of bringing this problem under control and hopefully starting to solve it. >> brown: all of this, amid rising fears that the syrian president might use chemical weapons against the rebels. in washington, defense secretary leon panetta joined a chorus of u.s. warnings. >> the intelligence that we have raises serious concerns that this is being considered. >> reporter: those concerns were echoed on capitol hil >> if syrian tv is catching this news conference, there's been a tidal shift here to where military force will be used to prevent those chemical weapons from ever seeing the light of day. >> brown: but syria's deputy foreign minister, speaking on lebanese t.v., charged that if anyone is planning to use chemical warfare, it's the west. >> ( translated ): we have strong fear of the existence of a conspiracy to use t
downturn or whatever else might happen. still, n.y.u. professor april klein says companies are over doing it. >> i know they say you can never be too rich or too thin, but companies can in fact be too rich. and, sometimes you do want to shrink out the cash. >> reporter: that's because too much cash can make a company a takeover target. and, with interest rates so low, all that money is just not productive. special dividends are one option for corporate treasurers struggling to spend it. but, what happened to firms investing capital for the future, by hiring new workers, buying other businesses, or on research and development? experts say we won't see that until lawmakers get their act together. >> right now corporate managers are essentially holding their cash waiting for greater policy clarity. and, until greater policy clarity comes, i don't expect to see an real significant deployment of cash whether it be in investment or returning cash to shareholders. >> reporter: and, then, there are share buybacks, which like dividends are popular this year. buybacks are considered a sign manageme
are having trying to find new projects in regions outside the u.s. and with interest rates currently at historic lows, the timing was right to ink the two deals. diane eaabrook, "n.b.r., chicago. >> tom: daniel rohr is a metals and mining analyst from morningstar and joins us from chicago. dan, how unique of a deal is this in the u.s. to have mining and energy drilling all in the same company? >> it is very unusual, forthe p. decades, ago, however, we had seen a lot of the oil majors, folks like amco, with exposure to mining as well. this is an animal we haven't seen in quit sometime in the u.s. >> t: what drove the deal for freport, why did it want to go outside its expertise mining, that was two generations of leaders ago. why now? >> yeah. i'm still struggling with the underlying strategic rationale for this deal. judging by the stock market, i can't see a clear rationale as far as why they did this. what management has said is they see a compelling story for oil and gas demand over the next several decades, and the purchase of plains and m.n.r., was a good way to bet on that outl
>> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. the unemployment rate drops to a four year low as u.s. businesses add 146,000 jobs in november. we look behind the numbers. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we meet the c.e.o.'s of three small businesses hiring right now. what they do and why they're looking for help. >> susie: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the job market is proving to be surprisingly resilient. american employers hired 146,000 workers in november, much more than expected. and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%, the lowest level since december of 2008. as erika miller reports, that wasn't the only surprise in today's report. >> reporter: almost no one on wall street saw this good news coming. there was every reason to think hiring would be weak last month. after all, many parts of the east coast are still recovering from devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12